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Intro


Crack the City

What to see and where to go in Johannesburg

 

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Intro


Crack the City

What to see and where to go in Johannesburg

 

 

Johannesburg or Jo'burg, Joeys, Jozi and Egoli as it is called by the locals, is not the dangerous stop-over towards big five safari lodges, or laid back Cape Town with its mountain and wine, nor the soulless business destination it is made out to be. It is in fact the largest city in the world not situated next to a coastline, river or lake. It still has the tallest building in Africa and is South Africa's melting pot of African and other cultures. 

Forced into existence because a man discovered gold in 1886, its history, unbeknownst to most, even most of its residents, is as old as history itself - Johannesburg sits in the midst of one of the richest paleontological sites in the world - The Cradle of Humankind.

Now, if that does not a great city make...

 
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Johannesburg


A unique day of old and new in downtown Johannesburg

 About this Tour

Johannesburg


A unique day of old and new in downtown Johannesburg

 About this Tour

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Soweto


Historical sites of the world famous Soweto.

About this Tour

Soweto


Historical sites of the world famous Soweto.

About this Tour

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Apartheid


Oppression

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Democracy

About these Tours

Apartheid


Oppression

to

Democracy

About these Tours

Racial segregation in South Africa began in colonial times under Dutch and British rule. However, apartheid as an official policy was introduced following the general election of 1948 in which The Nationalist Party came into power. New legislation classified inhabitants into four racial groups ("native", "white", "colored", and "Asian"), and residential areas were segregated, sometimes by means of forced removals. Non-white political representation was completely abolished in 1970, and starting in that year black people were deprived of their citizenship, legally becoming citizens of one of ten tribally based self-governing homelands called bantustans, four of which became nominally independent states. The government segregated education, medical care, beaches, and other public services, and provided black people with services inferior to those of white people.

In the 1994 general elections the African National Congress became South Africa's first black government with Nelson Mandela as the president.

The following tours address different aspects of the fight against the injustices of apartheid 

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Private Tours in Johannesburg with André

About Me

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Private Tours in Johannesburg with André

About Me